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Worship

The Significance of Praise



Two weeks ago in Sunday school, I began the lesson for our grade 1-5 class with a game. To my surprise, a number of the kids started shouting excitedly that we hadn’t shared our weekly news. Each week we always start class by taking turns sharing anything special we’ve done during the week like a sporting event, a special outing, some time with friends, or anything that brought them joy since we last saw them. This sharing then leads into our prayer and praise time.

I was thinking about praise this week and how to describe it to our Sunday school kids - what does it mean to praise God? Growing up in the church I always believed that praise was simply the time we spent singing at the start of service. However, praise is actually anything we do that expresses our appreciation and thankfulness for what God has done. A quick search reveals that “praise” is mentioned about 340 times in the Bible (NIV). Along with love, praise is one of the most frequently used verbs/action words – there must be a message in this. Psalm 145:3 reads, “Lord, you are great. You are really worthy of praise. No one can completely understand how great you are.”

In order for children to understand the significance of praise, they need to know more of who God is. By learning about trials, circumstances, characters and Scripture in the Bible, God’s attributes are revealed. God is loving, forgiving, holy, all-powerful, all knowing, merciful, just, sovereign and everywhere – to name a few. When children have the opportunity to know God, they can see He is worthy of praise! They can also see that God truly wants the best for them, and that He is concerned with every detail of their lives. That’s why we like to start every week with a time of reflection, and praising the great things God has done over the past week - we want to build this behaviour into the lives and routines of our kids. James 1:17 reminds us that “Every good and perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of the heavenly lights, who does not change like the shifting shadows.”

As Easter approaches, with Palm Sunday this week, we have lots of opportunity for praise and worship. We are coming together as a church community to celebrate the story of Jesus’ death and resurrection. It is through our risen Saviour that we have forgiveness and the assurance of salvation. What greater reason do we have to give praise this Easter!

Tanya Chant, Director of Family & Children's Ministry

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Looking Ahead

 

For those of you who don't know, before I started working here at the church, I worked in retail. (Glorious retail!) And, although I loved the people I worked with, I was so happy to move into the role I have now. I'm especially thankful as the Christmas season rolls around.

This past Christmas, our family was celebrating at my sister-in-law’s home. And as we were eating our Christmas dinner, my husband Mike said, “Hey Jo, remember the last time we were here for Christmas, we were packing up to go home at this time because you had to start work the next morning at 5a.m.”. Because, if there's one thing you know working in retail, it's that Christmas isn't truly Christmas if people can't go shopping for great deals on Boxing Day.

It just seems like people are always concerned with the next thing. Never content with where we are now, we constantly look to what might lay ahead.

To keep going with the retail theme, one year in late January I remember trying to buy some winter boots for my son who had grown out of his pair. No luck, they've already got the sandals out in the shoe store. Looking to buy a nice summer dress in July? Sorry, they've already rolled out the fall flannels. Sometimes this incessant looking ahead drives me crazy!

With one exception.

On December 26, after all the excitement of Christmas is over and I finally have a moment to rest, I sit down... and I think about Easter. Because the story of Christ's birth is beautiful and miraculous, but it means little to us without the incredible, powerful, life-giving work of the cross.

Sometimes these days after Christmas can be disorienting. You've spent so much time looking forward to a certain day, and – in a flash – it's here and gone. But Emmanuel, God with us, is as true and powerful today as it is on Christmas day, and as it was 2000 years ago. So after the wrapping paper has been cleaned up and the decorations are packed away, let's remember that, as God's people, we still have so much to look forward to. We have new life in Him, and an eternity to worship our Christ the Lord!

Jolene Sanders, Director of Worship
jolene@calvaryburlington.ca

Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! According to his great mercy, he has caused us to be born again to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, to an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled, and unfading, kept in heaven for you.

                                                                                                                        - 1 Peter 1:3-4

 

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The Rescuing Gift of Jesus Christ

 

It’s unfair that all the fun stuff is made for kids. Light up shoes? For kids. Scented markers? Apparently for kids. And while I do my devotionals and navigate through page after page of monotonous black print on white pages, kids get these beautifully illustrated Children’s Bibles. Pictures of animals lining up 2-by-2 to board the ark, or of the stormy sea before Jesus calms the waves. But my favourite Bible illustration – by far – can be found on the very first page; the lush green landscape of the Garden of Eden.

In my mind, I imagine a Sunday School teacher reading through the story of Genesis to her class. The children in awe as she describes the plants and animals. Giggling as Adam and Eve are strategically placed behind leaves and shrubbery. And then, as the snake slinks out of the tree and starts up a conversation with Eve, I imagine the kids shouting, “Don’t listen to him! Don't do it! He’s the bad guy!”

Or maybe I imagine that because that’s what I’m internally shouting as I read that story.

Looking at those painted figures on a page, it’s easy to think, “Really?? Eve! Adam! What’s the deal?! There was literally only one rule!” Adam and Eve had access to what seemed to be heaven on earth if only they would be obedient in this small way. I would give anything to be in that garden; to walk with God.

And yet, in full honesty, every day I struggle with obedience. Each morning I wake up determined to do my best, and each evening I skulk around like Adam and Eve did after eating from the forbidden tree. But we are not made to dwell on our sin (as I'm so often inclined to do) and it was in reading through Romans 5 that's I've started to reconcile this.

Read the verses here from the Message:

“So death, this huge abyss separating us from God, dominated the landscape from Adam to Moses. Even those who didn’t sin precisely as Adam did by disobeying a specific command of God still had to experience this termination of life, this separation from God. But Adam, who got us into this, also points ahead to the One who will get us out of it.

Yet the rescuing gift is not exactly parallel to the death-dealing sin. If one man’s sin put crowds of people at the dead-end abyss of separation from God, just think what God’s gift poured through one man, Jesus Christ, will do! There’s no comparison between that death-dealing sin and this generous, life-giving gift. The verdict on that one sin was the death sentence; the verdict on the many sins that followed was this wonderful life sentence. If death got the upper hand through one man’s wrongdoing, can you imagine the breathtaking recovery life makes, sovereign life, in those who grasp with both hands this wildly extravagant life-gift, this grand setting-everything-right, that the one man Jesus Christ provides?”

As we look ahead to communion this Sunday, (and even further ahead as we anticipate Christmas), let us dwell on this incredible “rescuing gift” that God sent in his Son. The sin of Adam and Eve belongs to us still, but the guilt and shame do not! Think about that! Delight in that!

So often I fall into the same sin that Adam and Eve did. And when I see it, I have the same exasperation as when I read that Genesis story. But the beauty of the grace of Jesus is that it far surpasses the sin of Adam. It far surpasses my sin and yours. So please come to Calvary this Sunday prepared to receive the overwhelming grace that is given through Jesus Christ.

Jolene Sanders, Director of Worship

But when the goodness and loving kindness of God our Savior appeared, he saved us, not because of works done by us in righteousness, but according to his own mercy, by the washing of regeneration and renewal of the Holy Spirit, whom he poured out on us richly through Jesus Christ our Savior, so that being justified by his grace we might become heirs according to the hope of eternal life. (Titus 3:4-7)

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