Resources

September 2018

Rooted in God

I love to go on long walks and hikes. Everyday I walk my dog in the park by my home I always pass a tree. It’s just an old tree, and I’m not even sure of what type it is, but every time I go by, I am reminded of my children and when they were little. Each of them climbed this tree on our visits to the playground, and somehow they all carefully navigated their way to the main branch.

 

That tree seemed so much bigger back then. Now when I pass by, I recall those moments and how quickly life goes by.

Have you noticed that the tree is a very symbolic image in Scripture? Many varieties are mentioned including the olive, palm, oak, willow, pine, fig, and poplar –  just to name a few. There are many themes that come from this imagery as well. We often talk abut being rooted in our beliefs and values, and bearing fruit from our faith.

We have such a small window of time to build into our children, to guide them and to be examples. 

I love that our church has a Sunday school program where our children can gather, grow and learn. Our children’s ministry is rooted in God’s Word and we teach from Bible-centred curriculum. May we be reminded that the roots are what give a tree its strength, and nutrients!

Tanya Chant, Director of Family & Children's Ministry

“Let the field exult, and everything in it!  Then shall all the trees of the forest sing for joy.” Psalm 96:12

“He is like a tree planted by water, that sends out its roots by the stream, and does not fear when heat comes, for its leaves remain green, and is not anxious in the year of drought, for it does not cease to bear fruit.”  Jeremiah 17:8

Comments
Login to post comments.

Attitudes of Worship

 

 

Is there any better feeling than being the best at something?

It doesn't even matter if it's something seemingly insignificant. Somehow, there's still satisfaction in knowing that if your talent somehow became an Olympic sport, you'd win the gold.

You may not know it, but I was pretty athletic as a kid. Track and Field was one of my favourite days of the year. Triple jump, high jump, 100 metre dash, I loved it all.

I remember one year in particular, when I was in grade 7. My whole class was out at the track, cheering each other on as groups of us ran the 400-metre race. I remember being so nervous, my heart beating so fast, as my group lined up and we were told to “Get ready... get set.... GO!” And I went! Sprinting around the track with all my might. The race was two times around the oval track and after the first lap I was in the lead. Classmates cheered all of us on as we started our second and final lap.

About halfway through the second lap, my classmates cheers became more intense, shouting my name and urging me to go faster. I pushed myself even harder, and by the time I crossed the finish line my legs felt like jelly.

My time was noted, confirmed, and my teacher announced that I had broken the school record for the girl's 400-metre run.

It was official. I was the best.

At the 400-metre race, at least, and even then, my record was broken the very next day when the 8th grade girls ran the race.

But for that one day, for 12-year-old me, life was good.

It's so easy to understand why people chase that feeling. It's also easy to understand why so many people are left frustrated and disappointed when their best doesn't measure up to those around them.

I have been serving as the Worship Director at this church for just over a year now. And I am thankful every day that Jesus accepts my best, even when it is far from the best. Every Sunday morning, as the nerves start to kick in, I pray a prayer that reminds me that what I offer to God – on a Sunday morning or otherwise – only has value because of the heart I offer it in. I want my worship to come from a heart that desires to bring glory always and only to our Saviour, Jesus Christ.

Attitudes of Worship

A month ago, I sent this article to our worship team about the attitudes of worship. I encourage you to read it. And as we come together on Sunday morning, let us come with honesty and humility, bringing our whole heart to Him as we worship.

Jolene Sanders, Director of Worship

But the Lord said to Samuel, Do not look on his appearance or on the height of his stature, because I have rejected him. For the Lord sees not as man sees: man looks on the outward appearance, but the Lord looks on the heart.”  
-  1 Samuel 16:7

Comments
Login to post comments.

Stories, Lessons and the Works of the Lord

When I was in High School I attended a church that believed that when you were too old to attend Sunday School, you were just the right age to begin teaching Sunday School. By the time I hit grade 10, I was teaching a boisterous class of grade 4 boys in a big gymnasium crisscrossed with room dividers.

Words can’t describe the noise level. Each week I came, woefully unprepared, to teach Bible stories to those boys and hoped I was making some sort of a difference. 

Recently I read Psalm 78 and reflected on those early days of teaching Bible stories in a gymnasium in Kitchener. You have to understand that Psalm 78 was written by Asaph; he had been appointed to pass on the stories of the marvellous deeds of God Almighty so that future generations would know and worship the Lord. But here’s the thing you'll notice when you read that Psalm: Asaph didn’t just tell the historical stories; he taught lessons about the goodness of God in the face of Israel’s repeated disobedience.

Stories and lessons?  C’mon, what’s the difference?

Well, the facts of what happened in Israel’s past is the story, but why and how God responded is the lesson. The physical and spiritual acts performed by God to rescue his people is a story, but the impact of how we worship and serve a faithful God is the lesson.

Psalm 78:6-8 tells us that God established a testimony and law which we are commanded to teach to our children so that they in turn tell their children, so they will set their hope in God and not forget His works. Check it out: 

He established a testimony in Jacob and appointed a law in Israel, which he commanded our fathers to teach to their children, that the next generation might know them, the children yet unborn, and arise and tell them to their children, so that they should set their hope in God and not forget the works of God, but keep his commandments; and that they should not be like their fathers, a stubborn and rebellious generation, a generation whose heart was not steadfast, whose spirit was not faithful to God.

And I think this goes beyond the value of just teaching stories to our own children – this is transferrable to the relationships we have with those who are spiritually younger as well. By knowing the law and testimony of God (the stories and the lessons), future generations will not harden their heart toward the Lord. 

I confess that many times I have told the stories of God without teaching the lessons. Telling the story is easy, but teaching the lesson is hard because it means getting personal.  It means examining my heart to ensure that God is doing a work there before I teach others about God wanting to do a work in their heart. It means being humble and teachable and vulnerable. It means ensuring that my testimony begins with God’s testimony. It means knowing with certainty that God is the hero of my story (both the parts in the past and the parts yet unwritten) before I try to teach anyone else that God also wants to be the hero of their story. I taught Bible stories for years before I realized that if the people don’t see how the lesson impacts me, they’ll never see how it can impact them.

You might be a Sunday School teacher or helper, or maybe you are influencing future believers in your family, workplace or your community. As you communicate God’s Word, remember that it is the lessons that draw people to set their hope in Christ.

I’d love to hear from you about the lessons God is teaching you. Let’s grab a coffee (or three!) and encourage each other with the marvellous works of the Lord.

 

Candi Thorpe, Director of Administration, Communication and Frontline Ministries
candi@calvaryburlington.ca

Comments
Login to post comments.

Each week we post about a range of things from the Christian life, faith and more.
In these posts we hope you'll catch a glimpse of ordinary people who serve an extraordinary God.