Christian Life | Calvary Blog | Calvary Burlington
Resources

Calvary Blog

Each week the Calvary staff blog about Christian life, ministry and more. Some of our blog posts focus on ministries and events inside the church, while other posts look outside our building to how we live out the gospel in our everyday lives. Each of these posts is crafted to encourage and challenge you in your faith journey. We'd love to hear from you! Create an account and log in to leave us a comment and let us know how the blogs impact you. 

 


 

Christian Life

Feeling Parched?

I have always loved desert imagery in the Old Testament; there’s something pretty amazing about God bringing beautiful new life to ground that had once been dry and barren.

In 2010 I had been going through a dry season in my spiritual life. I still loved Jesus and I knew He loved me, but I felt somewhat stuck in the ways I was growing. I was desperate for some relief from the dryness of my prayer life. I would go for walks in the evenings, asking God, “What needs to change? What are my next steps?”

One morning I opened an email from FEB Central and the first line jumped off the page. It said, “Have you ever wondered about your next steps?”

Yes!

The email described Women’s Ministries Institute, a 9-month course offered by FEB Central to equip women to grow deeper in their spiritual journey for effective leadership. I prayed about it and decided to join the class, graduating in June 2011. A few years later, Sarah Bean also joined, graduating as the Valedictorian of her class (Yay Sarah - great job!).

If you are a woman and are feeling like you are going through a place of spiritual drought, you are not alone. I know that there are days where you just go through the motions, and there are other days that you don't even bother trying to do that.

Sisters (and brothers!), we are promised in Isaiah 41 that when we are feeling dry and parched, God will not forsake us. He will pour out rivers, filling our valleys with life-giving water. He brings new growth to those places in our spiritual lives that have felt barren and dead.

If you'd like more information about WMI, you can talk to Sarah Bean or myself, and visit their website here: www.womensministriesinstitute.com. Maybe WMI isn't for you at this time, but please don't stop asking God, "What are my next steps?" Because God will always remind you that your next steps are the ones that draw you closer to Him.

Candi Thorpe,
candi@calvaryburlington.ca

Comments
Login to post comments.

Press On

It took me a while to decide what to write about this week. I wanted to write something beautiful and inspiring, but instead I’m going to write about discipline.

I even gave a few tries at writing a lovely little Mother’s Day blog, but no… we’re going to talk about discipline.

Before we go any further, take a moment to read through Hebrews 12.

To many of you it’s a familiar passage. It encourages us to run the race set before us. When I was younger, I always thought that was a great analogy, because it seemed so exciting! I pictured the 100-meter dash at the Olympics; adrenaline pumping, crowds cheering, putting everything on the line.

But the reality is that our race is more like a really, really, really long marathon.

You’re probably going to feel like walking for part of it. Or you might get a cramp partway through and wonder if you’ll make it to the finish line at all.

You will get tired.

But the author of Hebrews writes, “It is for discipline that you have to endure…. For the moment, all discipline feels painful rather than pleasant, but later it yields the peaceful fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it.” (Emphasis added)

As a parent, I know how difficult it can be to discipline a child. But I also know that not to discipline my son would be a disservice. Because I don’t just care about who he is now, I care about his whole life. It can be painful and frustrating, but we discipline our children because we love them.

And how much more does our Father in Heaven love us. So much so that he takes the time – despite our resistance, despite our stubbornness – to shape and mold us into who we are meant to be.

So press on - even when you feel exhausted, even when you’re overwhelmed – press on to the finish line.

Jolene Sanders, Director of Worship
jolene@calvaryburlington.ca

I do not claim that I have already succeeded or have already become perfect. I keep striving to win the prize for which Christ Jesus has already won me to himself.  Of course, my friends, I really do not think that I have already won it; the one thing I do, however, is to forget what is behind me and do my best to reach what is ahead.  So I run straight toward the goal in order to win the prize, which is God's call through Christ Jesus to the life above.” (Philippians 3:12-14)

“For He disciplines for our good, that we may share his holiness” (Hebrews 12:10)

Comments
Login to post comments.

God is Still on His Throne and He Still Cares

There is no doubt that the tragic events of the past couple weeks have rattled us all a bit. From the tragic loss of life in a bus crash to the senseless violence of a man in Toronto, all of us have been forced to hold our loved ones closer and recognise the brevity of life.

There are no easy answers when it comes to the why. Why did this happen? How could God have allowed this to take place? These are good questions. These are hard questions, and in the middle of the crisis there are no easy answers. I find later that after some time has passed, allowing a period of reflection, we can come to terms with some of these things, but it’s never an easy process.

What encourages me about both of these events is that people came together to reach out beyond themselves to find hope and encouragements. Many turned to their faith and it was in the confidence and hope of the gospel, they were able to start the process of healing and restoration.

Sean Brandow, the chaplain to the Homboldt Broncos, spoke to the community vigil of this hope when he said,

“Where was God? That question has two answers. God is on the throne and God is with the broken-hearted. We know that God is on the throne, Jesus walked this earth, he died, he was buried, he rose again. It says in the scripture that he is now seated at the right hand of the Father, in control of setting up our leaders, putting people in the place where they need to be at just the right time, for just the right purpose, making sure that things line up according to his plan. I don’t claim to understand how this seems like it’s in God’s control at all, but it is. He’s still on the throne, he’s still God. You know, I asked the question as you look at God on the throne, it’s easy to look at God from a distance but the second part of that question of where is God is that he’s with us.” 1

I’ll allow you to read the rest of the message yourself, but those two answers cut across the airways of Canada and beyond. In other words, our God is still sovereign and He is still with those who suffer. Powerful words to our nation who is struggling to find meaning in these situations. I don’t claim to understand how God’s sovereignty works, but I do know that He is working out His plan in this world that is so much bigger than me or my comfort. I don’t claim to understand how his comfort works but I do cling to the truth that He is with me no matter what. He loves us and in spite of the evil around us, He is with us through the pain and anguish – gently encouraging and speaking words of hope and love.

So this week, in spite of what is happening in the Homboldt or Toronto, be reminded of the hope that we have in Christ. Peter reminds the church of this hope today and a time coming soon.

“Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! According to his great mercy, he has caused us to be born again to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, to an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled, and unfading, kept in heaven for you, who by God’s power are being guarded through faith for a salvation ready to be revealed in the last time. In this you rejoice, though now for a little while, if necessary, you have been grieved by various trials, so that the tested genuineness of your faith—more precious than gold that perishes though it is tested by fire—may be found to result in praise and glory and honor at the revelation of Jesus Christ.” 1 Peter 1:3-6

Pastor Aaron Groat
aaron@calvaryburlington.ca

Comments
Login to post comments.

What's Your Story?

 

I love a good story. No matter if it is a children’s book, a biography, or an engaging video, I love to hear a well-crafted story. Unfortunately, if you have been in a relationship or married for any length of time, you know that stories can get old. So much so that I jokingly tell newlyweds to not use all their best material in the first year – they have the rest of their lives to tell the same stories over and over again (profound apologies to my dear husband who has heard all of my stories repeatedly over the last 27 years).

What about you, what's your story? When someone asks you about your faith, are you still talking about the moment that led up to your conversion, or do you have a new story to tell?

Don’t get me wrong - as believers we are supposed to tell the story of what God has done in our lives. Psalm 66 says, “Come and see what God has done; he is awesome in his deeds toward the children of men… Come and hear, all you who fear God, and I will tell you what he has done for my soul.”

Yet, when the Psalmist wrote these verses, I don’t think they were meant to serve as a passive observation of all the things the Lord once did. Instead, I believe they were meant to be a call for others to witness and testify to God’s mercy and power. Come and see! Come and hear! Come and experience! Come!

Notice how many times the Psalmists write about singing a “new song” to the Lord (see Psalms 33, 40, 96, 98, 144, and 149 as examples). These ancient hymns tell us, "Sing a new song, you who love the Lord,  because God continues to demonstrate goodness, marvellous grace, mercy, victory over the enemies of His people, and many other amazing things."

If you are a Christ-follower, you definitely have a conversion story. That thing that God once did in your life. But if God doing new things in your life and in mine, why are we still telling the same old story?

Now, before you think that I am defaming the song, Tell Me the Old, Old Story, please hear this - the story of the cross is timeless and absolutely should be told over and over again. That beautiful thing that was done on our behalf to deliver us from death to life underpins every single thing we could ever share about who we are, but it should also underpin why we live the way we do! We give God the glory because it is He who is doing the work in our lives. 

So what’s your story? Throughout the month of April, write down at least four ways the Lord has met your need, sustained you, answered your prayer, or delivered you.

Sing a new song. Tell a new story. God’s deeds are awesome yesterday, today and forever. 

 

Candi Thorpe, candi@calvaryburlington.ca

Comments
Login to post comments.

All You Need Is Agape



You may recall that during the month of February, our Student Ministries was working through the four ancient Greek words for love. We do studies like this to help us better understand what the original authors of the New Testament were trying to convey with their letters. And to better wrap our 21st century brains around 1st century people. We finished our series with the ultimate of all loves, which is Agape. Agape love describes the unconditional, divine love that God has for his creation, for us. Agape is a love that is selfless, and sacrificial. While researching this I stumbled on an article that describes Agape love like this;

“Agape...is unmotivated in the sense that it is not contingent on any value or worth in the object of love. It is spontaneous and heedless, for it does not determine beforehand whether love will be effective or appropriate in any particular case”

Agape love is not based on the value of what's being loved. Agape doesn't say, “If you're worthy of this, then you can experience it.” It doesn't require something; it is an undeserved love. Which makes perfect sense to why this is the love that the New Testament authors would use to describe God's love for us. We've done nothing to deserve His love, yet he gives it anyways.

Isn't that amazing?

I think of a passage like Romans 5:8, which states:

“But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us”.

Agape love. Unconditional, undeserving, sacrificial love for His creation. Why? Simply, because He does. We've done nothing to deserve it, we've in fact done everything in our power to reject it. Yet, He gives it, to the point of sending His son to die on a cross, that we might know it. Wow.

It's really easy to stop there, and just say, Agape love, that's God's love for us, neat!... BUT, our New Testament authors don't stop there. Several times we see this word used to describe how we ought to love others. John 15:9-13, We see Jesus commanding his followers...

This is my commandment, that you love (agapate) one another as I have loved (egapesa) you.”

Jesus is calling us to love each other sacrificially, selflessly, unconditionally, and maybe the toughest of all, undeservedly. That's tough, don't get me wrong. Agape love is a tall order that none of us should take lightly. But it's something we've been commanded to by Jesus himself. This word is also used to describe the love, in a passage you all likely know very well, Galatians 5:22-23, which states;

“But the fruit of the Spirit is love (agape), joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control; against such things there is no law.”

It's really easy to zoom past that first “fruit” and get to some of the more specific fruits of the Spirit. We get caught up thinking, okay, be kind, be patient, be peaceful, be good, be faithful, be loving. But the word used here is not philia (which describes a friendly love), nor storge (familial love). The word used in Galatians 5:22 is agape; unconditional, undeserving, selfless, sacrificial love. The fruits of the Spirit at work in our lives STARTS with this kind of love. And under this kind of love, the rest of the fruits get their framework, and their purpose. How God loves His creation, we too are to love.

We are about to enter into that time of the year where God's agape, love, is on display for all to see. Even the un-churched will hear of the sacrifice that Jesus Christ made for us all. When you approach the cross this Easter, reflect on God's agape for us. Reflect on the fact that you can't earn it, and that you've done nothing to deserve it, YET, God gives it freely, unconditionally, and sacrificially, because He loves you.

Mike Sanders, Youth Director
mike@calvaryburlington.ca

John 3:16:  “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.”

 

Comments
Login to post comments.

He Sat Down

 

I remember one of the first times I worked my way through the book of Hebrews. I had been hesitant to read Hebrews because I found it hard to understand all the Old Testament references and what they had to do with the message that the author of Hebrews was trying to communicate.

So, I sat down and started chasing all those footnotes and cross references that you find in your Bible (a little aside – this is one of the reasons why I don’t think your primary Bible should be a digital device that doesn’t include these). As I read the Old Testament quotes, suddenly the book came alive as I saw the incredible way the author built the case surrounding the supremacy of Christ and the power of salvation through His death on the cross.

One of my favourite sections – and really it’s the pinnacle of the book in many ways – is in chapter 10 where the author writes, (italics mine)

And every priest stands daily at his service, offering repeatedly the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins. But when Christ had offered for all time a single sacrifice for sins, he sat down at the right hand of God, waiting from that time until his enemies should be made a footstool for his feet. For by a single offering he has perfected for all time those who are being sanctified.

Hebrews 10:11–14 (ESV)

When I first read those verses, I wondered why it would mention “stands daily” and then “sat down”. Why would the author put these little details in? As I chased down the cross-references and read some other material I was struck with the thought that the reason why the priest could never sit down was because his job was never done. Every day, day after day, sacrifices would have to be made for the people by the priests. It was a never-ending job that required unbelievable dedication and endurance. There was no shortage of work. Sin continued to be committed, sin needed to be atoned for, and a sacrifice was necessary.

Until THE day when everything changed. Jesus changed everything.

Jesus gave His life as the final and ultimate sacrifice for your sins and mine. In one final act, Jesus took the punishment for our sin. The punishment that we are responsible for because we can’t keep God’s perfect law, was taken on Himself. Not multiple sacrifices, but ONE SINGLE SACRIFICE that made atonement for all sin for all time.

Let that sink in a minute as we approach the time of year where we come together as a church to remember that Jesus died and rose again (Good Friday and Easter) so that our sins can be forgiven and we can be made right with God. And then Jesus SAT down.

The priests in the tabernacle had no need of chairs because their work never ended, but Jesus Christ, the Great High Priest, offered himself as a single sacrifice for sins, for all time. After his sacrifice was offered and accepted, he did what no other priest serving in the tabernacle had done before. He pulled up a chair and sat down at the right hand of His Father (1). Your sin and mine has now been covered by the sacrifice that Jesus made. By faith, we accept that gift of grace. It moves me to tears to think that my Saviour did that for us, for His church, for any who would believe.

As we gather this Easter weekend, it is my prayer that the prodigiousness of this grace, that was poured out in the finality of Christ’s sacrifice, would move us all to proclamation and mission -  proclaiming the good news to our friends and neighbours and serving people as an expression of love because of what Christ has done for us. Why not invite them to join you on Easter Sunday at Calvary – you never know what they will say until you ask.

And remember…. He sat down…

Pastor Aaron Groat

aaron@calvaryburlington.ca

 

Comments
Login to post comments.

God the Protector

I have always enjoyed reading the book of Psalms.  It’s often my ‘go to’ if I’m looking for encouragement or I want to read a few verses for devotion.

The idea of God as our protector is a beautiful image and of great comfort. 

The person who rests in the shadow of the Most High God
Will be kept safe by the Mighty One.
I will say about the Lord, “He is my place of safety.  He is like a fort to me.
He is my God. I trust in Him.”

 

The Lord says, “I will save the one who loves me.
I will keep him safe, because he trusts in me.
He will call out to me, and I will answer him.
I will be with him in times of trouble.
I will save him and honor him.
I will give him a long and full life.
I will save him. (Psalm 91:1-2, 14-16)

 

The Bible offers many verses describing God as refuge, fortress, deliverer, shield, protector and strength.

On a drive to work one morning, there were two children who presumably were walking to school.  The older sister looked to be caring for her younger brother.  As they walked down the sidewalk, a large truck was parked, and was blocking part of the walk way.  The sister intuitively moved her little brother to her side opposite the truck and out of potential harm.  She was protecting her brother, took his hand and cared for him.

This small illustration made me think of God going before us and acting as our protector.  While we may face trials and obstacles of all sorts- God will certainly walk through things with us.

Tanya Chant

Director of Family & Children's Ministry

Psalms 46:1 - God is our place of safety. 

Comments
Login to post comments.

A New Thing

A New Thing

Ugh. February, am I right? What a “blah” month.

(Unless you're really into Valentine's day, or it's your Birthday month, then I'll allow you to enjoy it) The excitement of the holidays have faded. You've likely totally bailed on your New Year's Resolution. (I don't know who's reading this, but let's be honest with ourselves...)

February like the “Monday” of months.

Right now, as I look out the window, the snow is mostly melted; the only remnants being the hardened piles along the side of the road, crusted with gravel and old Tim Horton's cups. The sky is a melancholy grey, intermittent drizzles of rain adding to the dreary effect.

But guys, I'm excited! I'm excited because it smells like Spring. I know, I know, Spring is technically a month away, and there will likely be another snowstorm or two, but I can feel spring coming. That anticipation keeps me going through all of these “blah” February days. And I'm so thankful that – as Christians – we get to live in this same kind of eager expectation.

Isaiah 43:19 says, “Behold, I am doing a new thing; now it springs forth, do you not perceive it?”  God is doing a new thing. God is making us new! He is doing a work in us, even now (Phil. 1:6).

Can you feel it?

Those parts of us that were lifeless – that were buried, and covered in dirt and dust – will spring with new life.

In a couple of months, wildflowers will grow through the cracks in the sidewalk, the trees will be budding with secret promise, and these “blah” days of February will have been forgotten in light of the new life to come.

“Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and the sea was no more. And I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, 'Behold, the dwelling place of God is with man. He will dwell with them, and they will be his people, and God himself will be with them as their God. He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.' And he who was seated on the throne said, 'Behold, I am making all things new.'” (Rev. 21:1-5a)

Jolene Sanders, Director of Worship
jolene@calvaryburlington.ca

Comments
Login to post comments.

Halo Project

Over the last few months, the news in Canada has a bitter tone when it comes to freedom of thought and religion.  A name like Jordan Peterson, the U of T professor at the centre of a controversy surrounding the use of gender pronouns, is being used in conversations in an increasing fashion.  Add to this the government's recent requirement for applicants to the Canadian Summers Jobs program to sign an attestation stating they support Canadian constitutional rights as well as the right to reproductive choice, leaves any person of faith or faith-informed ethics wondering how long it will be before people of faith or conscience can live unhindered in our country.

 

Our government fails to recognise that people of faith or even differing faith values contribute greatly to the fabric of our Canadian society. They are guided in their behaviours precisely because their faith informs them so. If faith groups were to stop their mandate, the burden would have to be picked up by city, provincial or federal government in a way that would ‘hit them right in the pocket book’. 

 

While this post is not necessarily to argue issues at play in our broader Canadian context, the government does in fact need people of faith and/or faith informed ethical values to function in society in such a way that contributes to the health and vitality of our country.

 

Recently a study group was commissioned in Canada to look at the effect that churches and other non-profit agencies have in their cities and towns.  The study, now published online, is titled, The Halo Project.

“Any city’s social infrastructure includes several factors. Key among them would be local religious congregations. It has long been known in Canada that churches, synagogues, mosques, and temples have social, spiritual, and communal value. But what if we could measure the value of what they contribute to the common good in their neighbourhoods and communities? That is the jumping off point The Halo Project.

Inspired by similar research in the United States, the Halo Project began to examine and measure how religious congregations fare as economic catalysts. The first phase of this research examined 10 local congregations in Toronto. What we found was that those congregations all make significant common good contributions that have remarkable economic value when measured by traditional economic development tools.

But just how much economic good do those congregations do?”[1]

 

Do you know what they found?  The study may or may not surprise you.

 

The 10 congregations they examined in Toronto spent more than $9.5M in budgetary expenses, but the common good, or their 'halo effect', through "weddings, artistic performances, suicide prevention, ending substance abuse, housing initiatives, job training – and a whole host of other areas that make cities so much more livable – is estimated to be more than $45 million per year." The Halo Project reports that every dollar a congregation spends is the equivalent of $4.77 worth of services that the city does not have to provide.  

Applying that ratio just to the 220 parishes of the Roman Catholic archdiocese in Toronto yields a potential annual contribution of $990 million in common good services, and this represents only one religious tradition. The full impact of all religious congregations in Toronto would be staggering.”[2]

 

I find these results are sobering. 

 

Please do not let the media or anyone else fool you into thinking that the church or other religious groups do no not make a valuable contribution to our society.

It is my prayer that we would continue to build community partnerships that would benefit our community here in Burlington.  There are so many people who can be helped and encouraged through the work that we do through God’s people.  We do this “work”, not because we have to, but rather because our faith informs our values that we should.  As the prophet Jeremiah wrote to the people of Israel while they were in exile in Babylon.

‘But seek the welfare of the city where I have sent you into exile, and pray to the Lord on its behalf, for in its welfare you will find your welfare.’

Jeremiah 29:7

I trust that if we ever needed to hire summer students to assist us in our mission in the city, we would raise the money as a church ourselves and not have to depend on the government’s program.  I hope that Burlington knows that Calvary is here to love them, to help them, to encourage them, and when given the opportunity to talk about the hope that we have in Christ, that we share it with love and grace.  For another great article on this topic, I invite you to check out this article

 

Our mission at Calvary is, Making Disciples Who Love God, Love People and Serve our World.  All three of these phrases come together to point us to Christ’s mission for the church.  May we never forget that as disciples of Jesus Christ, we are called to “Serve our World.”

Pastor Aaron Groat

aaron@calvaryburlington.ca

Comments
Login to post comments.

Feeling Inadequate?

 

 

Inadequacy is something that we all, if we're being honest, struggle with at different times in our lives. We feel inadequate in our jobs, our families, our relationships, or even in our church. As 21st century humans, we are fraught with the perils of our self worth, our value, our contribution both to society, and to God. I am however encouraged to know that this feeling of not being good enough is something the Apostles also felt and wrestled with. It encourages me to know that they not only overcame it to accomplish great things in the name of God, but they turned it around to be a reflection on the goodness of God.

 

 

 

The Apostle Paul, in his second letter to the Corinthians, writes the following; starting in chapter 12, verse 7:

"But to keep me from getting puffed up, I was given a thorn in my flesh, a messenger from Satan to torment me and keep me from getting proud. Three different times I begged the LORD to take it away. Each time he said, 'My gracious favour is all you need. My power works best in your weakness.' So now I am glad to boast about my weakness, so that the power of Christ may work through me. Since I know it is all for Christ's good, I am quite content with my weakness and with insults, hardships, persecutions, and calamities. For when I am weak, then I am strong."

 

Paul recognizes that without this “thorn in my flesh” he would be prideful in his own accomplishments. But because of this weakness he cannot boast in himself, he can only boast in the way Christ works through him.

 

So when you are feeling inadequate, worthless, weak, or otherwise unworthy, remember that Christ's power works best in your weakness. For when you are weak, then you are strong.

 

Mike Sanders

mike@calvaryburlington.ca

Comments
Login to post comments.

The Church That Prays Together

“Aaron, there is a fine line between pastoral manipulation and motivation, make sure you stay on the motivation side and leave the other side to God.”

As a young pastor, these words were drilled into my head by my mentor. It was a truth that was to be lived at every turn when it came to pointing people to Jesus. When you think about it, using guilt to get someone to do something is always the easy means. We can get anyone do to anything if we guilt them into doing it but then we motivate them to grow in Christ, then Christ does the work and produces results that only the Holy Spirit can do.

All this to say, whenever we talk about prayer and our need to reengage in the practice, it’s super easy to dive into the guilt/manipulation world. It’s really easy to bring the hammer to feel the sting that we don’t pray like we should and that we could always resolve to do better.

I want us to understand that this is not the tactic that we are going to take when we talk about prayer this month. God wants us to do better than guilt; He wants us to come to Him because our hearts are inclined to Him. He invites us to come. My task as your pastor is to motivate us all to see the beauty that exists in communication with God. Not for what He will do for us but for what He wants to do in and through us.

Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.” Hebrews 4:16

How’s that for motivation? The writer of Hebrews motivates us to see the confidence that we can have in coming into God’s presence in prayer! Building on this, starting January 14, we want to spend four weeks motivating and encouraging us in the area prayer in our church.

Prayer is integral to the of the life of our church. If we want God to move in power in our lives and in our church then it has to begin with prayer. To supplement the weekly preaching and worship ministries on Sunday, some of events that we are looking forward to are:

  • A 24-hour prayer day (1 hour shifts/signup)
  • Encouraging weekly prayer huddles across our region
  • Evening concert of prayer & worship
  • Daily encouragement prayer emails over the series
  • List of requests
  • A social media campaign (#thechurchthatpraystogether)
  • Using the PrayerMate App as a tool to help us 

No matter where you are in your prayer life, it’s our vision to take the next step in growing in our discipleship at Calvary. I am looking forward to the journey. I know you will also. I think 2018, by God’s grace could be our best year yet! Let’s come together in prayer in see what God does in our lives and in the life of our church.

“First of all, then, I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for all people,” 1 Timothy 2:1

Pastor Aaron Groat

aaron@calvaryburlington.ca

 

Comments
Login to post comments.

Finding the Simple

 

 

As I write this, I have just finished packing up the costumes from this year's CB Kids Christmas program. It offers me a moment to reflect on all the preparations over the past six weeks, having the children learn songs and poems about Jesus’ birth. I’m reminded too of all the programs and presentations that Calvary has had in past years and the people who allowed us a moment to just pause in the business of the season. Through all of this, the message has remained the same year after year - God promised to send a Saviour to the world, and there in a stable, that promise came true. Jesus was born quietly and with simple beginnings. I love how God kept this incredible, world changing event so humble. He could have done it many different ways, with glitz and glamour, but that was not His plan.

 

 

It’s easy for us to get lost in the bustle of the season, but let's try to find ‘the simple’ this Christmas. Take moments to find peace and quiet in random, small things. I love playing board games with the family, watching a holiday movie with snacks, or hiking through trails. What are some activities your family likes to do?

I hope you all have a Merry Christmas and I wish you happiness for the year ahead!

Tanya Chant, Director of Family & Children's Ministry
tanya@calvaryburlington.ca

Luke 2:10-11

“But the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid. I bring you good news of great joy. It is for all the people. Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you. He is Christ the Lord.”

Comments
Login to post comments.